Digitisation During Lockdown ロックダウン時のデジタル化

Staying home as required during the pandemic has given me the time to sort and digitize, one by one, the 300+ photographs I found five years ago in a flea market. Purchasing or borrowing a flatbed scanner would have been an option, but instead I peered over each photograph in a bent over position with my DSLR, pressing the shutter to capture an immovable past, its decisive moment come and gone many decades ago, and its artefact, yellowed with time. Or is it? Immovable, that is.

During the tedious task of post processing digitised images: straightening, cropping, and taking out colour casts, I thought about the daily COVID-19 related news bulletins – not that there were any non COVID-19 related news on the bulletin at the time – the closing of borders, the emergency measures dictating what to do or not do by decree of government, the fear, racism and blame. I wondered how I would make sense of the way in which I had lived before the pandemic. Like many people, I travelled, and worked across borders. The subject matter of my work had been about exactly that – people who have crossed borders, specifically about the Japanese experience in Australia. When national borders and nation states necessarily protected us and our loved ones, I was left to wonder what exactly my optimistic perspective as a global citizen meant.

These photographs have somehow travelled to Australia. I travelled to Australia from Tokyo nearly 40 years ago. I made Sydney my home. Last year I made plans to spend one year in Japan to be near my family, to take photographs of the country of my birth. These plans are now in limbo. There is a sense of melancholy in my current undertaking.

Perhaps melancholy is what old photographs, by definition, instil in us. I look for the punctum in every photograph, of which I think I find many. I think, but there is no need. Time past is the punctum, and (should I even mention it) that they were once discarded? Weren’t they? Or perhaps they are simply lost – for now. All of this makes the subject matter of this project, bruising.

But unlike Roland Barthes’ mother, there are people in the photographs who are still alive today. Photographed as children in the early 1960s, many would be my age or slightly older. And there is plenty of optimism in these photographs. Some of the photographs of the children remind me of Nobuyoshi Araki’s early series Sachin, whose eyes reflect Japan’s post war hope for the new; the photographs of the young women workers at Kyoto Daiei Film Studio are full of promise, being part of the creative force that gave birth to Japanese post war films, like Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon.

In this time of lockdown, I am at home in Sydney, quietly digitising and being encouraged by the optimism present in these photographs.

Camera Lucida (La chambre claire) by Roland Barthes, first published in 1980 ロラン・バルト『明るい部屋─写真についての覚書』英文出版1980

コロナ禍の毎日、静かに家に籠もっているおかげで、5年前にフリーマーケットで見つけた300枚以上の写真を整理し、デジタル化する時間ができた。フラットベッドスキャナーを購入したり、借りたりして作業することも出来たが、デジタルカメラで接写することにした。ファインダーを通し、一枚一枚の写真と向き合いながら、シャッターを切る。もう何十年も前にその決定的瞬間は過ぎ、時とともに黄ばんでいく遺物の不動の過去を撮影する。過去は本当に不動なのだろうか。

フォトショップで接写の際に曲がってしまった画像を整えたり、余分な部分を切り取ったりしながら、毎日コロナ関連のニュース速報などについて考える。実際コロナ以外のニュースは何もない。国境の閉鎖、緊急措置、人々の恐怖、人種差別、非難。パンデミックが起こる前の自分の生き方をどうやって理解するのだろうか。多くの人と同じように、自分も国境を越え、仕事をしてきた。国境を越えた人々、特にオーストラリアでの日本人の経験をテーマにした仕事が多かった。国境や国家が愛する人たちや自分の身を必然的に守ってくれている今、グローバルな地球の市民としての楽観的な視点はいったい何だったのだろうかと問う。

写真は何らかの方法でオーストラリアにやって来た。自分は40年近く前に東京からオーストラリアにやって来て、シドニーが拠点となった。最近、家族のために1年間日本に滞在し、自分の生まれた国の写真を撮る計画を立てていたが、今ではその計画は宙ぶらりんとなり、この作業を続ける毎日に憂鬱さを感じる。

古い写真が人間にもたらすのは正しく、憂鬱さのなのかもしれない。写真一枚一枚の中からプンクトゥムを見出すが、実はそのような必要はない、過ぎた時間こそプンクトゥムであるし、それに(言うべきか)、一度は廃棄された写真なのだ。いや、もしかしたら、単に今、失われているだけかもしれない。どちらにせよ、うち身あざのような痛みを感じる。

しかし、ロラン・バルトの母親とは違い、写真の中には今も生きている人たちがいる。1960年代初頭に子供の頃に撮影されたものは、その多くは自分と同い年か少し年上かであろう。そして、写真の中には楽観的な部分がたくさんある。子どもたちの写真の中には、荒木経惟が初期に撮影した「さっちん」を思い起こさせるものもある。子供達の目には戦後日本の新しい希望が反映されており、京都大映撮影所で働く若い女性たちの写真は、黒澤明の『羅生門』をはじめとする戦後日本映画を生んだ創造力の一端を担い、将来性に満ちている。

そして、この自粛時に、自分はシドニーの自宅にて、これらの写真に込められた希望を静かにデジタル化しています。

Sachin by Nobuyoshi Araki, first published in 1964 『さっちん』荒木経惟1964

Mayu Kanamori April 2020
2020年4月