2 Comments

  1. We received a comment from a student at Tsukuba University:

    This photo shows a military ceremony held at an educational institution. There is presumably a red and white (cloth) banner at the back, often used for celebrations. People in the foreground are wearing what was called kokumin fuku or citizen’s clothes, worn during WWII.

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9B%BD%E6%B0%91%E6%9C%8D

    The people dressed in white in the middle left might be women, seeing off the marching youth. So, this ceremony may be to send off the Gakuto- shutsujin (学徒出陣) or (drafted) student troops.
    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%AD%A6%E5%BE%92%E5%87%BA%E9%99%A3

    筑波大学の学生さんからコメントをいただきました:
    この写真は、教育機関で行われた軍事式典の様子です。奥に見えるのは、お祝いの時によく使われる紅白の垂れ幕だと思われます。手前の方達は戦時中に着ていた国民服を着ているようです。国民服は第2次世界大戦中に用いられました。

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9B%BD%E6%B0%91%E6%9C%8D

    左中、白い服を着ている方達は、若者の行進を見送っている女性かもしれません。この式典は、学徒出陣の壮行会かもしれません。
    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%AD%A6%E5%BE%92%E5%87%BA%E9%99%A3

    Reply
  2. We received an email message from Yasuo Takao: It might be a ‘gakuto shutsujin’ (学徒出陣) ceremony. Japanese university students were initially exempt from national conscription, but with Japan’s increasingly desperate position towards the latter part of WWII that ruling was reversed by Imperial Edict in October, 1943. Mobilization for military duty or for work made the students feel that they were responsible for the fate their country and ceremonies similar to the photo were part of their show of patriotism. After Japan’s defeat, feelings of betrayal and disillusionment shaped the postwar student movement.

    Yasuo Takaoさんからメールを頂きました:
    これは「学徒出陣」の儀式かもしれない。日本の大学生は当初、徴兵制が免除されていたが、第二次世界大戦の後半にな李、日本の状況が悪化したため、1943年10月の勅令でその規定が廃止された。 兵役や勤労動員により、国の行く末に責任を持つという意識が芽生え、写真のような儀式が愛国心の表れとして行われた。敗戦後の学生運動は、裏切りと幻滅の感情とともに形成された。

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.